Wednesday, August 19, 2009

Is the LIVE MUSIC BUSINESS flawed?


As the tech world gets greater and greater, and home technology stronger, and the economy and people's spending power weaker, will people ultimately not go to see live music anymore? Do you think that live music plays a large part of people's lives? My opinion is 50/50. I'd like to hear someone elses...

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I only make it a plan to go see live music when I know the band that's playing, whether it's an 80's band I love or a band that is always playing at a certain bar on a certain night.

I think most people have become jaded about music today and don't feel like spending $10 or $20 to see a new band is going to be worth their money.

Part of the problem may be not knowing anything about that singer or band and not knowing who they even sound like so others can have a reference as to what to expect.

David said...

Because of the state of the record industry and no definitive way to distribute digital music it's fair to assume that this will have some bearing on the live music scene and the way fans are conditioned to consume.

Albums as a cohesive package with a story line have slowly started to become more and more scarce over time. Digital downloads sold as singles have really put an end to this idea as consumers have the option to pick through albums and purchase only the songs they like. With this in mind, an Artist could set out with the intention to create an album with a structure and order for the tracks but when it goes to the market it's up to the consumers if they want to hear it as the Artist intended.

Only the most die-hard fans experience the Artist's in their entirety. Most fans are just in it for the immediate gratification and never really get around to understanding what an Artist is about or why they write and record the way they do.

What does this mean for live music? Fans come to shows to hear specific tracks and Artist's do what they can to satisfy, but it's becoming harder and harder for Artist's to deliver an exciting performance when fans aren't willing to understand why they're there or what they're truly about.

Flawed? No. Evolving with the digital age? Much more likely.....

Anonymous said...

I am a sound tech for motion pictures and a live music lover. I travel all over the world. I seek out great venues for hearing/watching live music where ever I'm working. The live music business is probably "flawed", but I continue to enjoy being in a space with a good band, good food, good drinks & good people! Please keep up the good work! Thanks.

Anonymous said...

Without musicians performing in local bars or restaurants, I wouldn't have met some really great friends whose performances I now seek out. As recording fidelity becomes poorer in quality, it's usually better to see music live. The only experience that failed to hold true was seeing Donald Fagen this past year. His precision in the studio doesn't hold up live.

-Live Music Lover born in the late 70's